Webinar: Exploring Social Poverty: A Webinar Discussion of the Impact of Family and Community Ties for Low-Income Populations

On this December 3, 2019 webinar, author and Associate Professor, Sarah Halpern-Meekin, explored the question of whether the lack of close, meaningful social ties is a public – rather than just a private – problem in our society in her newly published book “Social Poverty: Low-Income Parents and the Struggle for Family and Community Ties”. This book provides a window into the nature of social ties among low-income, unmarried parents, highlighting their often-ignored forms of hardship. During this webinar Halpern-Meekin presented on her ground-breaking work, which explores poverty from a new angle that departs from typical poverty literature and explores social ties not just as an economic issue, but its own condition that also perpetuates poverty. Discussants, Amanda Kostman, from UW-Madison Division of Extension, Margie Zutter and Diana Jost from Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) of Dane County, and Johnna Georgia, Program Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Dane County, spoke about their experiences in developing and providing services to address these issues of “social poverty”.

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Webinar: What Motivates Consumers to Check their Credit?: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Most consumers do not obtain their annual credit report or participate in credit monitoring offered by credit reporting agencies and financial institutions. In 2010, only about 16 million American consumers checked their credit for free through one of the big three credit bureaus. Many possess inaccurate beliefs about their creditworthiness despite the availability of free credit checks. Financial decisions made with inaccurate credit information may be costly for consumers, harm their ability to borrow in the future, and, ultimately, diminish financial well-being. This study builds on a growing literature on reminder effects. Using a field experiment with a credit union in the United States, the effect of email reminders on credit checks is analyzed. The results from the study reveal that reminders are largely ineffective in encouraging consumers to check their credit.
In this October 23rd webinar, researcher Madelaine L’Esperance provides background on the study followed by presentations from the practice and policy perspectives.

Webinar: How are Older Adults Affected by Debt Stress and Mortgage Borrowing? Study Findings and Implications

Researchers, Stephanie Moulton, Caezilia Loibl, and Donald Haurin, from The Ohio State University shared study background and findings for their research on “Debt Stress and Mortgage Borrowing in Older Age: Implications for Economic Security in Retirement”, which was funded through the Social Security Administration’s Retirement and Disability Research Consortium.

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Webinar: Nursing Home Care and the Impact of an ACA Program: An Overview of Study Findings and Implications

One in three 65-year-olds will require long term care at some point in their lives. Medicaid currently covers nursing home expenses for 6 out of 10 residents. Not all those who require care need enough help to justify moving into a nursing home, but in many states Medicaid will not pay for care received at home. In these states, moving into a nursing home is the only way to get help paying for care.

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Financial Coaching Census 2019: Results Brief & Webinar

On July 30th, 2019, AFN presented it’s Ask the Author with Hallie Leinhardt, Center for Financial Security sharing on findings revealed from the 2019 Financial Coaching Census.

After 3 waves of coaching censuses between 2015-2019, we know a lot about the coaching field, and we’re excited to share the trends and their implications.

We discussed webinar to find out what these trends mean and what is called for moving forward:

  • How has the field evolved over time?
  • What are the primary financial coaching outcomes measures?
  • What are the persistent challenges in the field?