Jason Fletcher

Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology
University of Wisconsin-Madison

jfletcher@lafollette.wisc.edu


Areas of Research Interest: A specialist in health economics, economics of education and child and adolescent health policy, Professor Fletcher focuses his research on examining social network effects on adolescent education and health outcomes, combining genetics and social science research, estimating long-term consequences of childhood mental illness, and child and adolescent mental health policy.

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Gov. Evers appoints Collins to retirement security task force

Professor J. Michael Collins

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers appointed UW–Madison Professor J. Michael Collins as a public member of the Governor’s Task Force on Retirement Security. The task force will study issues facing the growing number of retired people in Wisconsin, particularly the amount of money they have saved.

A member of the La Follette School faculty, Collins is the Fetzer Family Chair in Consumer and Personal Finance at UW–Madison and Faculty Director of the Center for Financial Security (CFS) for the School of Human Ecology.

Earlier this month, the CFS received a second year of funding from the Social Security Administration’s Retirement and Disability Research Consortium to explore the financial well-being of financially vulnerable families, older people, people with disabilities, low-wealth households, and children.

“Your experience, knowledge, and dedication will be a true asset to my administration and a great benefit to the people of Wisconsin,” Evers said in Collins’ appointment letter.

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Webinar: What Motivates Consumers to Check their Credit?: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Most consumers do not obtain their annual credit report or participate in credit monitoring offered by credit reporting agencies and financial institutions. In 2010, only about 16 million American consumers checked their credit for free through one of the big three credit bureaus. Many possess inaccurate beliefs about their creditworthiness despite the availability of free credit checks. Financial decisions made with inaccurate credit information may be costly for consumers, harm their ability to borrow in the future, and, ultimately, diminish financial well-being. This study builds on a growing literature on reminder effects. Using a field experiment with a credit union in the United States, the effect of email reminders on credit checks is analyzed. The results from the study reveal that reminders are largely ineffective in encouraging consumers to check their credit.
In this October 23rd webinar, researcher Madelaine L’Esperance provides background on the study followed by presentations from the practice and policy perspectives.

Leafia Ye

PhD Student, Sociology
CFS Retirement & Disability Research Center Fellow
University of Wisconsin-Madison

ye43@wisc.edu


Leafia Zi Ye is a PhD student in Sociology at UW-Madison, where she is also an affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology. Her research focuses on the physical and economic well-being of immigrant populations in the United States. She is particularly interested in how immigrants’ access to resources changes over the life course and how their health and economic trajectories may be connected. As a CFS RDRC fellow, she works on a report that explores nativity differences in retirement resources and their implications for health in later life.

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