CFS RDRC Newsletter Now Available with Calls for Applications for Four Training Programs

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Financial Security Retirement and Disability Research Center (CFS RDRC) is an applied research program which develops evidence that can assist policymakers, the public, and the media in understanding issues in Social Security, retirement, and disability policy, especially related to economically vulnerable populations. The CFS RDRC incorporates diversity of viewpoints and disciplines, develops diverse emerging scholars and generates research findings that are used in policy and practice. To this end, CFS has released four calls for applications for training programs within the CFS RDRC.

Read more about the CFS RDRC in our newly released Newsletter and subscribe to our CFS RDRC updates:

Ross, Zhou Release Working Paper on Documenting Loss Aversion using Evidence of Round Number Bias

Stephen Ross, CFS Affiliate and Professor in the Department of Economics at University of Connecticut, along with his co-author Tingyu Zhou, Assistant Professor in the Department of Risk Management/Insurance, Real Estate, and Legal Studies at Florida State University, release working paper that builds on existing literature documenting loss aversion in the housing market, where expected losses lead to higher sales prices. Ross and Zhou study how exposure to expected losses may correlate with unobservables that influence housing prices.

Newly Released Paper and Brief: Does State-mandated Financial Education Affect Financial Well-being?

This paper and brief, authored by Jeremy Burke, J. Michael Collins, and Carly Urban, estimates the causal effect of required high school financial education on the financial well-being of young adults. Financial well-being includes people’s subjective sense of financial management, as well as their confidence in achieving their unique financial goals. This study shows that financial education improves financial well-being, though benefits accrue primarily to men and those who obtain college degrees.

This paper and brief, authored by Jeremy Burke, J. Michael Collins, and Carly Urban, estimates the causal effect of required high school financial education on the financial well-being of young adults. Financial well-being includes people’s subjective sense of financial management, as well as their confidence in achieving their unique financial goals. This study shows that financial education improves financial well-being, though benefits accrue primarily to men and those who obtain college degrees. The research was supported by a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation.

Newly Released Research Brief: Understanding Differences in Financial Well-being Based on Educational Attainment and Gender

With the support of a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation researchers, J. Michael Collins and Carly Urban, conducted a study that examines the financial well-being of young adults through the lens of gender and educational attainment. Using the CFPB’s Financial Well-Being Scale, the research contrasts the financial well-being of men and women among college graduates and high school only graduates.

Webinar: Exploring Social Poverty: A Webinar Discussion of the Impact of Family and Community Ties for Low-Income Populations

On this December 3, 2019 webinar, author and Associate Professor, Sarah Halpern-Meekin, explored the question of whether the lack of close, meaningful social ties is a public – rather than just a private – problem in our society in her newly published book “Social Poverty: Low-Income Parents and the Struggle for Family and Community Ties”. This book provides a window into the nature of social ties among low-income, unmarried parents, highlighting their often-ignored forms of hardship. During this webinar Halpern-Meekin presented on her ground-breaking work, which explores poverty from a new angle that departs from typical poverty literature and explores social ties not just as an economic issue, but its own condition that also perpetuates poverty. Discussants, Amanda Kostman, from UW-Madison Division of Extension, Margie Zutter and Diana Jost from Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) of Dane County, and Johnna Georgia, Program Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Dane County, spoke about their experiences in developing and providing services to address these issues of “social poverty”.

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