CFS RDRC Awarded Fourth Year of Funding to Support Research on Financial Vulnerability

U.S. Social Security Administration approves 13 major research projects, investigating a range of social insurance topics, including the Child Tax Credit, the geography of long-term care, the effects of COVID-19 on older adults, and improving trust among those targeted by scams and frauds.

The University of Wisconsin—Madison’s Center for Financial Security (CFS), as part of the Retirement and Disability Research Consortium (RDRC), has been awarded a fourth year of funding for $2.2 million from the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA). One of just four RDRC centers in the country supported by SSA, the UW-Madison center has a particular focus on the financial well-being of economically vulnerable families, older people, people with disabilities, low-wealth households, and children. 

“The pandemic has really highlighted the financial vulnerability of many families, and how important safety net programs are to keep people financially stable,” says CFS Faculty Director Dr. J. Michael Collins, Fetzer Family Chair in Consumer and Personal Finance in the School of Human Ecology and Professor at the La Follette School of Public Affairs. “We are grateful for the Social Security RDRC to be able to support this research, including work related to the ongoing impacts of COVID-19 for disability, retirement and social insurance programs.”  

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Spring 2021 Speaker Calendar

February 4: The Center for Financial Security Retirement and Disability Research Center, Discussion of Research Priorities and Information Session on Research Opportunities

February 11: Nancy Wong, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Have I Saved Enough to Social Distance? The Role of Household Financial Preparedness in Public Health Response

February 18: Steve Wendel, Behavioral Technology, & Cliff Robb, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Study design: Inoculations to Resist Online Scams

February 25: Marti DeLiema, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Identity theft and older Americans – Who experiences the worst outcomes?

March 4: Pamela Herd, Sebastian Jilke, Donald Moynihan, Georgetown University, Improving Public Understanding of OASI: An Experimental Approach

March 11: Isaac Swensen, Montana State University, The Effects of Expanding Access to Mental Health Treatment on SS(D)I Applications and Awards

March 18: Chris Herbert, Jen Molinsky, Samara Scheckler, Harvard University, Spending on Health Among Older Adults Before and After Mortgage Payoff

March 25: Won-tak Joo, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Retirement in the Context of Intergenerational Transfers

April 1: Irena Dushi and Brad Trenkamp , Social Security Administration. Improving the Measurement of Retirement Income of the Aged Population

April 8: Yulya Truskinovsky, Wayne State University, Unemployment Shocks, Unemployment Insurance and Caregiving

April 15: John Nunley, University of Wisconsin La Crosse, R. Alan Seals, Auburn University, The Changing Task Content of Jobs for Older Workers

April 22: Patricia Boyle and Lei Yu, Rush University, and Gary Mottola, FINRA, Aging, financial exploitaiton and fraud

April 29: Stephanie Moulton, The Ohio State University, Economic Security in Retirement: Does borrowing from home equity moderate the impact of a health shock on health outcomes?

May 6: Lydia Ashton, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Using Online SSDI Conversations to Improve Communication and Outreach?

May 13: Daniel Mangrum, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Impacts from Financial Aid Shocks: Evidence from Changes to Pell Grant Generosity



Jevay Grooms

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics

Howard University

Jevay.Grooms@howard.edu

Areas of Research Interest: Public Economics, Health Economics, and Studies of Poverty and Inequality.

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