Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Economic Well-Being

Richard M. Tolman, LMSW, PhD,, University of Michigan School of Social Work
Richard M. Tolman, LMSW, PhD,, University of Michigan School of Social Work

Rich Tolman researches the effects of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) on the economic well-being of women.  The research demonstrates that IPV may affect women’s economic well-being in a multitude of ways.  Perpetrators of IPV may directly interfere with or purposefully impede the economic well-being of women.

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In its broadest conceptualizations, the set of behaviors designed to harm women’s economic well-being is called economic abuse (Weaver et al., 2009; Adams et al., 2008).
Beyond the direct economic abuse that IPV victims suffer, IPV may create physical and psychological distress or dysfunction that interferes with their economic well-being (e.g., by reducing or disrupting stable employment). Additionally, disruption or dysfunction related to IPV and its aftermath can negatively affect women’s economic well-being (e.g., the costs of relationship dissolution, housing displacement, credit problems, increased child care costs, health and mental health care costs). The remainder of this issue brief explores the relationship between IPV and women’s economic well-being.